Tranexamic acid podcast and resources

In this post Andrew Petrosoniak discussed the use of tranexamic acid in the prehospital trauma setting, and  Auckland HEMS is currently developing a prehospital protocol its use in our service.

About a year ago, Scott Weingart from emcrit.org interviewed Dr Tim Coats, one of the lead authors of the CRASH 2 trial. The interview, which covers a lot of practical territory, became a podcast on emcrit.org in early 2012.

The podcast is here.

Dr Weingart’s ‘show notes’, which include a link to a draft protocol by Minh Le Cong for tranexamic acid in the prehospital setting, are here.

 

 

 

Sim and Choppers

I have written about checklists in medicine before, but in light of a recent publication in the New England Journal of Medicine, I was inspired again to write about it.

One of the leading advocates for checklists in medicine is Atul Gawande. His book “The Checklist Manifesto” is an excellent read for anyone interested in the topic and definitely well written for the lay-person. Notably he’s also the senior author on this randomized trial just published in NEJM. And while the NEJM is often busy publishing some questionably biased and often pharma-funded studies, this one deserves attention. But before I discuss more about the trial…I digress…

Just this week, while we were flying I observed something quite interesting. Typically when we fly in the helicopters, our pilots ask our crewman for landing checks. At which point the crewman will go through the checklist with the pilot answering appropriately. We…

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New clinical simulation lab at ARHT and our newest team member!

Over the past few months at ARHT, we’ve been working to secure a location that can be used as our clinical sim lab. While most of our sim is done outside, this will allow for a “think tank” and location to keep all of our supplies. A spot like this will have a huge positive impact on improving our ability to run effective in-situ simulation.

Rossi, our Emergency Medicine award winning medical student (and newest team member) While it may not be the exact replica of the EM award...it's pretty close!

Rossi, our Emergency Medicine award winning medical student (and newest team member) While it may not be the exact replica of the EM award…it’s pretty close!

In addition, we plan to use this site for task training and trialling new equipment. While it has taken some time to get it organized, we’ve made huge progress recently. One of the main reasons we’ve had such success can be attributed to our newest education team member, Rossi, who is a senior medical student at the University of Auckland. She has a keen interest in emergency medicine, retrieval medicine and trauma. Her enthusiasm has been crucial to getting us up and running with a fully functional sim lab. We should also acknowledge her recent achievement as the recipient of a special mention in Emergency Medicine for dedication & teamwork at U of Auckland Medical school. Welcome Rossi, and we look forward to all that you bring!

I also felt it would be great to show the progress we’ve made with the sim lab. This will be an outstanding location to think, work and practice. We’ll be able to re-pack packs for simulations and engage in task training modules.

Here’s a few pics of the progress…and completion!

Sim lab: the beginning

Sim lab: the beginning

Rossi doing her best Vanna White impersonation

Rossi doing her best Vanna White impersonation

Sim Lab: the current state! Ready for use!

Sim Lab: the current state! Ready for use!

Sim Lab: airway task trainers...clearly needing a cric to be performed!

Sim Lab: airway task trainers…clearly needing a cric to be performed!